Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 5th International summit on Medical Biology & Bioengineering Chicago, USA.

Day 1 :

OMICS International Bioengineering 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Mahmoud F Almasri  photo
Biography:

Mahmoud Almasri received BSc and MSc degrees in physics from Bogazici University, Istanbul, Turkey, in 1995 and 1997, respectively, and a PhD in electrical engineering from Southern Methodist University (SMU), Dallas, TX, in 2001. He is currently an associate professor with the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Missouri. From 2001 to 2002 he was a research scientist with General Monitors, Lake Forest CA. From 2002 to 2003 he was with College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering Albany, NY, as a post doctoral research associate, and from 2004 to 2005 he was with Georgia Institute of Technology as a post doctoral fellow, and a research scientist. His current research include impedance biosensors, MEMS capacitors for power harvesting, Si-Ge-O infrared material, metasurface based uncooled IR detectors, and MEMS Coulter counter for studying time sensitive cell. His research is funded by agencies such as NSF, USDA, ARO, Leonard Wood Institute, and Coulter Foundation.

Abstract:

This presentation will provide an overview of the food safety testing requirements for ready to eat (RTE) food, and raw (NRTE) food, and will discuss the recent impedance biosensor developments in my group for rapid and simultaneous detection of single and multi-pathogens in poultry. The device initially focuses and concentrates the bacteria into the centerline of the microchannel, and directs them toward the sensing region. The bulk media will be directed to the waste outlets through the outer channel. The bacteria will then be trapped on top of the sensing region using trapping electrodes which confine and facilitate the contact and binding of salmonella antigens with salmonella antibody immobilized on the detection electrodes. Various low concentration E.coli and Salmonella samples were tested with and without the trapping electrodes to determine the sensitivity of the biosensor. The lowest measured concentration of Salmonella cells was found to be 13 cell/ml with a detection time of 30 minutes.

 

Keynote Forum

Manh-Huong Phan

University of South Florida, USA

Keynote: Recent developments in magnetic impedance biosensors and related medical devices

Time : 10:10-10:40

OMICS International Bioengineering 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Manh-Huong Phan photo
Biography:

Manh-Huong Phan has obtained a global education with BS, MS and PhD degrees in Physics from Vietnam National University (2000), Chungbuk National University – South Korea (2003), and Bristol University – United Kingdom (2006), respectively. He is an Associate Professor of Physics at the University of South Florida. He has published more than 230 peer-reviewed journal papers (h-index: 37 from Google Scholar) and one text book. He is an Associate Editor for the Journal of Electronic Materials and the Managing Editor for the Journal of Science: Advanced Materials and Devices.

Abstract:

Early detection of cancer cells in the body greatly increases the chances of successful treatment. While traditional methods, such as visual identification of malignant changes, cell growth analysis, specific-ligand receptor labeling, or genetic testing often require lengthy analysis, a combination of ultrasensitive magnetic field sensors with functionalized magnetic nanoparticles offers a promising approach for a highly sensitive, simple, and quick detection of cancer cells and biomolecules. In this talk, I will review recent progress in the development of magnetic impedance biosensors using nanoparticles. I will present a new approach that integrates the magneto-resistance (MR), magneto-reactance (MX), and magneto-impedance (MI) effects to develop a functional magnetic biosensor with tunable and enhanced sensitivity. The MX-based probe shows the most sensitive detection of superparamagnetic nanoparticles (~10 nm diameter) at low concentrations. A novel biosensor based on the MX effect of a soft ferromagnetic ribbon with a microhole-patterned surface has been developed, demonstrating its high capacity for the detection and quantification of anticancer drugs and proteins tagged to Fe3O4 nanoparticles, as well as Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cancer cells that have taken up Fe3O4 or MnO nanoparticles. Finite element simulation fully supports the experimental observations. Finally, novel classes of magnetic nanostructures for advanced biosensing and new exploration in medical diagnostics will be discussed.

Keynote Forum

David W Schmidtke

University of Texas, USA

Keynote: Novel redox polymer films for biosensing and biofuel cell applications

Time : 11:00-11:30

OMICS International Bioengineering 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker David W Schmidtke photo
Biography:

David W Schmidtke is a Professor of Bioengineering at the University of Texas at Dallas (UT-Dallas). He has received his PhD in Chemical Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin and completed his Postdoctoral studies in the Institute of Medicine and Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania. Prior to joining UT-Dallas, he was a Professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of Oklahoma, and served as the Director of the University of Oklahoma Bioengineering Center. He has been a recipient of both an American Heart Association Scientist Development Award and a National Science Foundation CAREER Award.

Abstract:

Molecular wiring of the redox centers of enzymes to electrode surfaces via redox polymers has attracted considerable attention due to its use in developing biosensors for metabolic monitoring of glucose in diabetes, detection of hybridization reactions in RNA and DNA assays, antigen-antibody binding in immunoassays, and in miniaturize biofuel cells. However for these devices to be useful their sensitivity and lifetime must be sufficient for them to be operated by portable low-cost electronics. This talk will describe our research on the design of a new class of redox polymers based on attaching ferrocene (Fc) redox centers to linear polyethyleneimine (LPEI). We will provide an overview of how the polymer and redox center structure affects their stability, redox potential, and ability to electrically communicate with enzyme redox centers? We will discuss, how these novel redox polymers can electrically communicate with the redox centers of a variety of enzymes (e.g. glucose oxidase, horseradish peroxidase, fructose dehydrogenase) and generate bioelectrocatalytic current densities >1 mA/cm2? Finally, we will discuss how these redox polymers can be combined with the unique properties of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs) for both biosensing and enzymatic biofuel cell applications?

Keynote Forum

Yingxu Wang

University of Calgary, Canada

Keynote: From bioengineering and cognitive engineering to brain inspired systems

Time : 11:30-12:00

OMICS International Bioengineering 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Yingxu Wang photo
Biography:

Yingxu Wang is a Professor of Cognitive Informatics, Brain Science, Software Science, and Denotational Mathematics. He is President of International Institute of Cognitive Informatics and Cognitive Computing. He is a Fellow of ICIC, a Fellow of WIF (UK), a P.Eng of Canada, and a Senior Member of IEEE and ACM. He received a PhD in Computer Science from the Nottingham Trent University in 1998 and has been a full Professor since 1994. He is the Founder and Steering Committee Chair of the annual IEEE International Conference on Cognitive Informatics and Cognitive Computing (ICCI*CC) since 2002.

Abstract:

The ultimate universe of discourse of the natural world can be perceived as a parallel dual encompassing the concrete and abstract worlds. The former is studied at the chemical, physical, biological, physiological, brain, and sociological layers. However, the latter is studied at data, information, knowledge and intelligence layers underpinned by mathematics as the general abstract science. Bioengineering is a trans-biological-and-engineering filed that solves organic, life, body and brain problems as well as medical, agricultural and socioeconomical applications at the molecular, gene and neural levels. Cognitive engineering is an adjacent layer beyond bioengineering that study cognitive and brain-inspired systems based on cognitive and intelligence sciences. Both biological and cognitive engineering leads to brain-inspired systems and AI applications which are bioengineered and cognitively implemented mimicking the brain and the natural intelligence. Latest basic studies reveal that novel solutions to fundamental AI problems are deeply rooted in both the understanding of the natural intelligence and its biological and cognitive mechanisms. Theoretical and methodological breakthroughs in biological and cognitive engineering enable a wide range of novel applications in life science and AI. This keynote lecture will present some of the recent bioengineered and cognitive engineered systems such as cognitive sensors, cognitive neural networks, cognitive robots, brain-inspired systems, cognitive learning engines, cognitive knowledge bases, and applied cognitive systems.

 

OMICS International Bioengineering 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Gary L Bowlin photo
Biography:

Gary L Bowlin is a Professor and Herbert Herff Chair of Excellence at The University of Memphis in the Department of Biomedical Engineering. He received his PhD in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Akron in 1996. His laboratory has published extensively in the area of electrospinning for tissue regeneration templates with over 125 peer-reviewed manuscripts. Google Scholar data shows his group’s published works have been cited over 16,600 times, resulting in an H-index of 54. He has also been granted 12 US patents and over 35 foreign patents and is a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors.

 

Abstract:

Neutrophils, the innate immune response sentinels that predominate during the first hours of the inflammatory response associated with a biomaterial implant, are short-lived, suicidal killers that have minimal impact compared to subsequent, more widely studied cell types (i.e. macrophages). This perpetuated belief continues despite considerable recent progress in defining the neutrophil functions and behaviors in tissue repair. This presentation will provide an overview of the neutrophil's numerous, important roles in both inflammation and resolution, and subsequently, their potential critical role in biomaterial/tissue regeneration template integration. As it stands, neutrophils function in three primary capacities: Generation of oxidative bursts, the release of granules, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). These highly orchestrating functions enable neutrophil involvement in inflammation, macrophage recruitment, and macrophage differentiation, resolution of inflammation, angiogenesis, pro- and anti-tumor roles, and immune system activation. Germane to this presentation is the fact that neutrophils exhibit great plasticity to adapt to their tissue microenvironments, thus allowing for the engineering of biomaterial composition and architecture to potentially influence neutrophil behavior following the biomaterial-neutrophil acute confrontation. While much remains unknown with regards to the neutrophil’s overall role in the tissue integration of biomaterials, this presentation will serve to highlight the neutrophil's plasticity, reiterating that neutrophils are not just simple suicidal killers, but key players in inflammation, resolution, and tissue regeneration.

Keynote Forum

Urmila M Diwekar

Vishwamitra Research Institute, USA

Keynote: From particulate processes to in vitro fertilization modeling and optimization

Time : 13:15-13:45

OMICS International Bioengineering 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Urmila M Diwekar photo
Biography:

Urmila M Diwekar is the President and Founder of the Vishwamitra Research Institute, a non-profit research organization. From 2002-2004, she was a full Professor in the Departments of Bio, Chemical, and Industrial Engineering and the Institute for Environmental Science and Policy, University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). She was the first woman full Professor in the history of UIC's Department of Chemical Engineering. From 1991-2002 she was on the faculty of the Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), with early promotions to both the Associate and Full Professor levels. In Chemical Engineering, she has worked extensively in the areas of simulation, design, optimization, control, stochastic modeling, and synthesis of chemical processes.

Abstract:

In-vitro fertilization (IVF) is a treatment process for infertility by which oocytes or egg cells are fertilized by a sperm outside the body in a laboratory simulating the similar conditions in the body, and then the fertilized eggs are implanted back into the uterus for full term completion of pregnancy. IVF is divided into four stages, namely: Superovulation, egg collection, insemination/fertilization, and embryo transfer. Superovulation is an important step in IVF and involves the production of multiple eggs using drug induced simulation. In normal female body only one egg is ovulated per menstrual cycle, but with the use of fertility drugs and hormones, a number of follicles (eggs) can be produced per cycle. This involves daily injections of drugs/hormones and daily monitoring of number and size of eggs produced. The success of IVF depends on the quality and quantity of eggs produced in the superovulation stage. The drug delivery per day depends upon the distribution of egg size obtained previous day. Hence close monitoring is involved. The cost of drugs and monitoring makes this stage very expensive stage in the IVF cycle. Particulate processes like crystallization are well-understood phenomena which involve models of particle size distribution. In this work, we use the analogy between particulate processes like crystallization to derive customized models for IVF patients. The first two days of follicle distributions for each patient are used to develop the model for the effect of hormones on the size distribution as the treatment progresses. Optimal control theory then is applied to find optimal dosage of hormones for each patient. It has been shown in our theoretical analysis and preliminary clinical trials in India that this approach reduces daily monitoring to a minimum. This approach also reduces the total drugs given to patient significantly with better outcomes of superovulation stage. In future, we will be conducting a large scale clinical trial with this approach in the United States. This new way of modeling biomedical processes with size distribution can be applied to other diseases like Cancer treatment.